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Where I went scrounging around for a meal last night, tonight I was determined to make something more… Wholesome. Four-fifteen this morning found me in the midst of a triage, cleaning up my eldest son’s bloody nose caused by overheating as he slept. I hadn’t gone back to sleep so by the time I got off work at 3:30 p.m., I barely had enough juice to make it home. A “quick” two-hour nap later (really, I set the alarm for 45 minutes!), it was after 7 p.m. and I almost gave in. But I needed this tonight.

The title says “better”, which begs the question, “How so?” In large part, because it is NOT a store-bought, rubbery hockey puck. It is light, crunchy and delicious, whether you choose to bake them or pan-fry them. Go wild with your toppings – you won’t regret it!

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Sweet Potato Quinoa Burger

1/2 cup uncooked quinoa (mixed red and white)
1/2 sweet onion, diced
1/2 green bell pepper, diced
1/2 cup raw pepitas
1/2 sweet potato, shredded
1 egg
1/2 cup garbanzo flour
Salt, pepper, garlic powder and red chili pepper, to taste – don’t be shy, season these guys up!

Put raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds) into 1 cup of hot water; set aside to soak while quinoa cooks.

In a large pot, add quinoa to a cup of water, bring to a boil then cover and reduce to lowest heat. Simmer for 15 minutes or until water is absorbed then fluff and allow to cool a bit.

Combine onion, pepper, sweet potatoes and egg in a large mixing bowl. Season well and set aside.

Drain and rinse pepitas then pulse in a food processor to a rough chop. No need to over process these; just get them broken down so they don’t end up being too huge of a chunk in your final product.

Add pepitas and quinoa to the mixing bowl and mix well with your hands (as you would a meatloaf). Begin adding garbanzo flour, sprinkling in a tablespoon or two at a time, mixing well between each addition. Use as much as you need to take away the excess wet of the egg, adding more if needed. It doesn’t need to be too dry, just not runny.

Form into patties and bake in the oven at 375 degrees for 25 minutes, flipping once in the middle. Alternatively, pan-fry in coconut oil on medium for a few minutes per side. Or you can bake THEN pan-fry briefly to crisp the burger up. Any way you decide, you’ll enjoy a fulfilling meal. I topped mine with mashed avocado and roasted garlic-infused olive oil then opted to skip the bread and wrap it in a romaine lettuce leaf. So good I had a second – and my hubby had a THIRD!

That’s what I call success. Now if I could just convince my offspring to try them…

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I might be in love. With two things, actually. The soup I threw together this evening and… Parsley. I’m not in love with having to write this post for the second time since I’m still coordinating the iPhone app with the online postings… Oh well. Some of my witty thoughts may be missing from this version. Can only hope I’ve learned my lesson: refresh the app before you edit and update the post!

Soup is a fickle friend to our family. I think I might be the only one who really likes it. My two little boys won’t eat it and my husband seems to view it as the last bastion of the ailing – he’ll usually only eat it if he’s sicker than a dog. Add to that my lack of proficiency in soup-making and, well, I don’t really hold it against him that this dish didn’t thrill him.

On the other hand, I was tickled pink with the results! This recipe was simple, filling, economical and protein-packed with an anti-inflammatory boost from the parsley. Parsley: it’s not just a throw-away garnish!

Edamame and Quinoa Corn Soup

1/3 c white quinoa (mine was pre-rinsed)
1 bag Cascadian Farms brand frozen, shelled edamame
1 1/2 c Imagine brand Organic Creamy Corn Soup
1/2 sweet onion, diced fairly large
1/8 c parsley, roughly chopped
Seasonings to taste (a dash of cayenne and a bit more salt are must haves)

Add the quinoa to 1 cup of water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low simmer and cover for about 10 minutes. Add the frozen edamame and corn soup; increase heat to medium and cook for about 15 minutes, stirring frequently to keep quinoa from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Add onion and seasonings of choice – I like Nature’s Seasonings blend and a Kroger Pizza Seasonings blend in addition to cayenne and salt. Oh, and garlic powder. Cook for about 5 more minutes and test/adjust seasonings as needed. After a couple more minutes, turn off heat and add parsley (please don’t just skip it, I’m begging you – you’ll love what it adds). Serve immediately with crusty wheat bread and olive oil for dipping the bread.

Sometimes, just sometimes, things are so tasty that I’m not really all that sorry that I’m the only one in the house who eats them!

What ingredients are your favorite to use when you’re low on time, cash or patience and you need some at least a half-homemade fare?

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So, I thought to myself, if I can post to my Blogger blog through an app on my iPhone, surely I can post to my WordPress blog that way as well!

Why in the world did THAT epiphany take so long?!? I’m not sure that my family will love that I’m “playing” on my phone more, but can I tell you, I’m ecstatic!!

Ahem. Mistress of Whatshouldhavebeen Obvious may step aside now so Madame Playsinthekitchen uhLot can take her place.

I like the idea of whole grain dishes that can be eaten cold or room temperature but, having tried making them in the past, I’ve never been thrilled with the results. They are just sort of… Bland. When I make them, that is. Apparently, the Whole Foods folks are far more adept at it than I am. Until… I hit on a simple (and probably obvious) solution: add the “dressing” to the freshly cooked, still hot grains!! Hahaha – Duh!

Wheat Berries with Dried Cranberries and Pecans
1 cup wheat berries
1/4 c dried cranberries
1/4 c raw pecans
1/4 c olive oil
4T raw apple cider vinegar
4T powdered cactus honey

Soak, drain, rinse and cook wheat berries according to package directions. While that is cooking (which takes a while), soak the pecans in room temperature water. When the wheat berries only have a few minutes of cooking time left, mix the powdered honey into the apple cider vinegar and stir to dissolve. Add olive oil and whisk briskly to combine. Drain fully cooked wheat berries then return to pot and pour in olive oil mixture. Add dried cranberries and stir well. Drain and rinse the pecans thoroughly then add to pot; stir to combine. Allow to sit and cool then transfer to fridge. Enjoy cold or at room temperature!

What are your favorite grains to use for “salads” like these?

Caulifrittata

So tasty I almost forgot to get a photo before it was gone!

Economy of ingredients has been an important focus for me lately. When you’re eating in restaurants a lot, as I have a tendency to do when my life gets stupid busy, you lose a gauge for how much an appropriate portion size for you is as well as how many of which ingredients comprise the larger portions you’re consuming. It’s easy, then, when you (ostensibly) return to your own kitchen, to go way overboard with ingredients. This can happen even if you’re working from a recipe. For home cooks like me who tend to just start pitching stuff in pots, well, sometimes you end up with a ridiculous amount of food. That can lead quickly to moldy leftovers because, really, who cares to eat ten servings of Quinoa Minestrone or Mama Hummus over the course of five days. I love the stuff, but I’ll be the first to state categorically “NOT ME!” (And, believe me, I can put away some Mama Hummus!) None of us wants to know we’ve wasted not only food, but the money and time required to prepare it, too.

Stand-by recipes, then, become vital go-tos as we near the end of our own unique buying cycles – these are recipes I call upon that are versatile enough to allow for unending variety in the amount of each required element along with the capacity to utilize most any remainder ingredients.

Enter the Almighty Frittata! When it’s almost time to go to the grocery store, but you absolutely need to use up what you have on hand before then, frittatas are a nearly perfect vehicle. I only add the caveat “nearly” because they’ll obviously not be an option if you don’t eat eggs; however, if you do, these meals-in-a-pan are wonderful!

Back to the portion control, frittatas are useful in two ways. First off, the size of your pan largely dictates how much total frittata you can make. I usually use a deep-sided frying pan that has a well-fitting lid. Secondly, you can use just about any leftover ingredient, raw or pre-cooked, in the making of these beauties. I usually find mine filled with onion (there’s ALWAYS an onion around), some variety of peppers, and often enough yellow or zucchini squash. Once upon a day, there was a good portion of cooked hamburger crumbles, though not so much for me anymore. A little cooked, leftover quinoa would be an excellent protein replacement for meat.

Here’s the key: it doesn’t have to be much of anything! An eighth of a cup of diced bell peppers, a quarter of a diced onion, half a cup of meat – really any veggie you can slice, dice, chop or grate!

Perusing my crisper drawer yesterday, I actually found a couple ingredients I’d never used in a frittata before. Et voila! The Caulifrittata was born!

Caulifrittata

1 cup of cauliflower crowns, chopped fairly small
1/8 cup shredded carrots
1/4 cup bell peppers, diced (whatever color you happen to have is fine)
1/8 cup onions, diced (again, whatever type you have on hand)
2-3 organic eggs, lightly beaten
Splash of milk mixed into eggs (optional)
Handful of shredded cheese (optional)
Seasoning blend of your choice

Sauté the veggies in an oil of your choice (I prefer extra virgin coconut oil most of the time) until the cauliflower starting losing their opacity. Using a spatula, move the veggies toward the middle of the pan in an even layer, leaving about an inch around the edges of the pan. Sprinkle on a seasoning blend and add some cheese if you are so inclined (I used Veggie Shreds). Allow the cheese to melt only a little then pour the egg mixture in the center. Turn the pan so the egg gets evenly distributed then push some of the veggies back toward the edges. Turn the heat very low and cover.

Check after about 15-20 minutes – when the edges look set but the center is still “wet”, drain off any excess liquid (mostly water from the cauliflower) using a large spatula to hold the frittata in the pan then continue to cook uncovered for another 5-10 minutes. When the top looks pretty firm and the edges nice and brown, turn off the heat and allow the frittata to rest on the stove for a few minutes. Slice, serve and enjoy!

Servings: 2-4, depending on your appetite!

This recipe is great as a make-ahead, too, because it travels well and heats very quickly in a microwave. Also, it’s easy to enjoy for ANY meal of the day.

What ingredients do you always find you have on hand prior to a grocery store trip? Would they be good in a frittata? Dare to get funky and give them a try!

Persnickety Eater :: Sweet Potato Pancakes

Mmm… Thanksgiving in a Pancake!

Hmm… What’s a mommy to do when her offspring eschew vegetable matter in almost every form? HIDE IT!

So, I’m not proud of this, per se, but it has become a bit of a necessary evil. Hopefully it will be a temporrary measure. Besides, these really were delicious, I have to admit, and economical to boot.

While I’ve been avoiding dairy for the past couple months (and truly enjoying the results of this decision), I have found that a limited amount of milk or butter that is cooked or baked into something doesn’t seem to upset my stomach. I won’t drink a glass of milk or spread butter on a piece of bread – I’ll use soy, almond or coconut milk and soy-free, buttery spread from Earth Balance instead. Cheese and yogurt will turn me into a crampy mess if I eat even the tiniest bit, and I haven’t had the nerve to try ice cream.

In order to have the leeway to make a single meal that all of us can enjoy AND that I have the opportunity to add veggies to, I know I can almost alway count on pancakes, even though they usually contain milk and butter. I have to acknowledge that if I try to get “too weird” with the pancakes, altering them to be wholly vegan, I’ll be the only one eating them. So this recipe is a very traditional pancake recipe with the addition of a sweet potato and an adjustment of the milk.

Sweet Potato Pancakes

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon palm sugar
  • 2 cups organic milk
  • 1 organic egg
  • 3 tablespoons organic butter, melted
  • 1 sweet potato, baked and mashed with a fork
  • A handful of praline pecans, powdered sugar, maple syrup or agave nectar (optional toppings)

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. In a separate bowl, mix the milk, egg, butter and sweet potato. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the wet ingredients; mix until smooth. Add more milk if needed to thin the batter.
  2. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each pancake. Flip when edges are dry and bubbles begin to form on top. Brown on both sides and serve hot with toppings of your choice.

I think I’d like this just as well with pumpkin in place of sweet potato. Or for a fun treat, use purple sweet potatoes! 

What vegetable would you try adding?

Mmm... So fresh and tasty!

Since it’s summertime and that’s the time for T-O-M-A-T-O-E-S, I have a fully summer dish, almost entirely prepared from purchases I made this morning at our local Suwanee Farmers Market. (Some extra virgin Australian olive oil is the only ingredient I acquired elsewhere.)

Colorful and Lovely

First, I had to refrain from eating all the tomatoes. Seriously. They are so perfectly ripe and delicious, I almost couldn’t help myself. I think I did eat close to a third of these plain before I was finished with the salsa!

I have culled you, my pretties!

I decided to go with the larger, green tomatoes and the medium-sized dark purplish tomatoes because they seemed to jump out at me. The other little ones are easy to pop in my mouth, but these larger ones? Not so much. Too much of a squirty-texture issue for me, if you’ll kindly forgive my oddities.

The ingredients, gathered and ready to go.

 The onion was just a small, sweet, white one that I diced then halved – part for the processor, the other to give the final product chunkiness. I’d never tried these lovely peppers before but went on the advice of the growers that they are mild. At only $2 for a dozen or so, I knew I couldn’t go wrong at least giving them a try. The garlic is from last week’s market trip – a luscious variety so very different from grocery store commodities as to be an almost wholly other species.

They're so green, they look like little melons.

 These just made me smile – practically perfect, bright green – I might be in love.

Sure wish I knew what variety these are...

 So very juicy I had to slice them carefully over top of the food processor’s bowl so I didn’t lose even a drop of their goodness.

Think I diced it finely enough?

 Not wanting to take a chance that I’d get this salsa hotter than I could handle, I removed the seeds and diced the little green pepper finely.

Almost ready for go-time!

 Full food processor – time to add a splash of olive oil (probably about 2 tablespoons or so) and fire that puppy up!

Hmm... Doesn't look terribly appetizing, does it?

 There really wouldn’t have been anything wrong with leaving the salsa like this. After I processed it, I mixed in the diced onions that I’d reserved, but it was just so watery that it didn’t seem “finished”. What else did I buy today, what else could fill this out? Hmm…

FRESH, RAW SWEET CORN – YES!!!

Salsa finished - ready to hang out in the fridge and "mingle".

 So much better and perfectly acceptable to eat as-is. So I did. Eat some. Then tried to figure out what else I could slather it over. Then remembered that I’d only finished breakfast about 30 minutes earlier. Not to mention the half pint or so of tomatoes I ate while I was fixing it. Yeah.

So it’s hanging out in my refrigerator, flavors getting good and matured together. I’m still not sure what I’ll do with it, but guaranteed I’ll enjoy the fool out of it!

I just can’t resist – I have at least three recipes hanging out in the wings, replete with photos, but summer seems to hold a premium on my time that just won’t allow for sit-down-and-type-a-proper-blog-post. A shrug of the shoulders follows and I figure I’ll catch up over the winter.

HOW.E.VER

I can’t resist throwing out a teaser of things to come, like a Zucchini Raw Pasta that was tested and found more-than-passable by raw foodies and those not so into that lifestyle alike. I’m also scheming an alternate version of my friend’s luscious mac and cheese recipe, probably with black beans because my littlest child loves his “bees” (we’re working on getting the “n” in there).

The Farmer’s Market near my home has yielded some wonderful food, including my first ever brush with garlic from somewhere other than the grocery store. W-O-W!! I couldn’t believe the difference – the soft, velvety texture and gentler aroma of the fresh garlic was just another reminder of why I’m trying to learn more about fresh, whole foods. Exquisite!

So. Teaser for you, my Dear Reader, and motivation for me to follow-up later! Happy Eating!!

Have window sill, can grow.

This could possibly be the most exciting thing I’ve ever done. No, really. I think it might even beat out the time when I was 18 and talked two elderly, retired gentlemen I’d never met before to motor me around Lake Lanier (in North Georgia) to find some friends who were out on a sailboat I’d never seen before and that had no working radio on board.

I. Am. Growing. Something. Edible.

Beans + Water + Time = Sprouts

Purposely. For the very first time. Ever.

They were shrivelled before they went into the cold water. I promise.

So, yeah, you can get technical with me if you really must and point out that I’m only sprouting them, not actually growing them into full and proper plants that will produce more of the same.

Bah, I say – These suckers are G-R-O-W-I-N-G!

Look at these lovely little sprouts!

Admittedly, I’m a little nervous about actually eating them once they’re grown. Especially since I missed a rinse cycle this morning. The instructions for sprouting all have a ring of absolute authority to them and I have no previous experience, even as a bystander, so I’m wary. I’ve rinsed them well to try and get the slightly slippery feeling mostly gone. There’s also a portion of the batch that’s grown more than the rest so I’ve separated them out. The “less grown” have gone back into my sprouting jar and the “more grown” (I’m tempted to call them “horny”) are in the process of drying out so I can seal them and refrigerate them until tomorrow.

It's horny... Like a unicorn!

Upcoming: Sprouted Raw Almond Hummus – Because I’m soaking some almonds now, too. Wheee!

Heavenly Hummus - Absolutely Divine

In our household, hummus is king. It’s the one and only legitimately “healthy” food that my picky child will eat. Our other munchkin doesn’t care much for the stuff – sometimes he’ll eat it and sometimes he won’t but he’s an otherwise excellent eater so I don’t fuss myself much over his food consumption. I’ve even been known to try and “hide” stuff from my picky eater but I must not be very good at it because he almost always sorts out my attempts at subterfuge.

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For the Love of Garlic

So, experimenting with foods is fun, right? And incorporating techniques from other cultures is a must, correct? Okay, well, that’s the basis for this somewhat intricate “Slow Food” recipe. There is a recommended variant at the end that un-Vegan-izes it, but you’re free to leave that step off if you’re preparing with those guidelines in mind.

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Mountain Rose Herbs

Mountain Rose Herbs